One Person, No Vote (YA edition): How Not All Voters Are Treated Equally (Paperback)

One Person, No Vote (YA edition): How Not All Voters Are Treated Equally Cover Image
$12.99
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Winter 2019 Reading Group Indie Next List


“Carol Anderson’s White Rage was a revelation, not so much because it explained things we didn’t already know, but by framing the narrative as she did, it became impossible to view the history of backlash against civil rights progress as anything but systematic. To an even greater extent, to read One Person, No Vote is to understand more clearly than ever how the powerful in this country are relentlessly fighting to deprive our most vulnerable citizens of their most fundamental right.”
— Frank Reiss, A Cappella Books, Atlanta, GA

Description


A timely and essential history of Black voter suppression, adapted from the National Book Award longlisted adult book

This young adult adaptation brings to light the shocking truth about how not every voter is treated equally. After the election of Barack Obama, a rollback of voting rights occurred, punctuated by a 2013 Supreme Court decision that undid the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Known as the Shelby ruling, this decision allowed districts with a history of racial discrimination to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice. This book follows the stunning aftermath of that ruling and explains how voter suppression works, from photo ID requirements to gerrymandering to poll closures. It also explores the resistance: the organizing, activism, and court battles to restore the basic right to vote to all Americans.

Complete with a discussion guide, photographs, and information about getting involved with elections in teens' own community, this is an essential explanation of the history of voting rights-and a call to action for a better future. As the nation gears up for the 2020 presidential election season, now is the time for teens to understand the past and work for change.

About the Author


Tonya Bolden is a critically acclaimed award-winning author/co-author/editor of more than two dozen books for young people. They include Finding Family which received two starred reviews and was a Kirkus Reviewsand Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year; Maritcha: A Nineteenth-Century American Girl, a Coretta Scott King honor book and James Madison Book Award winner; MLK: Journey of a King, winner of a National Council of Teachers of English Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children; Emancipation Proclamation: Lincoln and the Dawn of Liberty, an ALSC Notable Children's Book, CBC/NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People, and winner of the NCSS Carter G. Woodson Middle Level Book Award. Tonya also received the Children's Book Guild of Washington, DC's Nonfiction Award. A Princeton University magna cum laude baccalaureate with a master's degree from Columbia University, Tonya lives in New York City.
www.tonyaboldenbooks.com

Praise For…


“. . . [D]ocuments centuries of techniques designed to limit progress in the black community. Although some of the material may be upsetting, this is a book that should absolutely be included in the curriculum.” —School Library Connection, starred review

“[A]n accessible narrative form, showing young people through pivotal historical events the ways in which white rage has been able to effectively undermine black-led social movements for equality and justice.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“This highly recommended book arrives just in time to educate newly eligible voters for the 2020 election.” —School Library Journal

Product Details
ISBN: 9781547604982
ISBN-10: 1547604980
Publisher: Bloomsbury YA
Publication Date: July 6th, 2021
Pages: 288